Early Childhood Education

Letter Blocks Logo[A55220G] Associate in Applied Science Degree
[A55220TL] Early Childhood Education - Transfer with Licensure
[A55220NL] Early Childhood Education - Transfer with No Licensure
[D55220] Diploma
[C55220] Certificate
[C55290] Infant/Toddler Care Certificate
[C55220A] Early Childhood Administration Certificate

The Early Childhood Education curriculum prepares individuals to work with children from birth through age eight in diverse learning environments. Students will combine learned theories with practice in actual settings with young children under the supervision of qualified teachers.

Course work includes child growth and development; physical/nutritional needs of children; care and guidance of children; and communication skills with parents and children. Students will foster the cognitive/language, physical/motor, social/emotional, and creative development of young children.

Graduates are prepared to plan and implement developmentally appropriate programs in early childhood settings. Employment opportunities include child development and child care programs, preschools, public and private schools, recreational centers, Head Start Programs, and school-age programs.

Graduates of the Transfer with Licensure and Transfer with No Licensure programs, who have earned 60 semester hours in approved transfer courses with a grade of “C” or better and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, will receive at least 60 semester hours of academic credit upon admission to a UNC institution.

English Placement Testing will be required for all EDU courses, except EDU 119.


EARLY CHILDHOOD CREDENTIALS TRACK FOR STATE CERTIFICATES

Under the credentials track, there are three options, depending upon the need of the student:

  • In order to meet the minimum North Carolina credential requirements to teach in a childcare center, students must take EDU 119 (Early Childhood Education).
  • In order to meet the minimum North Carolina School-Age credential requirements, students must take EDU 145 (Child Development I) and EDU 235 (School-Age Development). EDU 144 is not a prerequisite for EDU 145.
  • Early Childhood Administration Credential I & II - Completion of these courses will meet the minimum credential requirement to be a director of a childcare center. Note: EDU 119 is required as either a prerequisite or a corequisite.

CERTIFICATE, DIPLOMA, AND DEGREE TRACKS

Early Childhood certificates may be obtained in three areas - Early Childhood Education Certificate (16 semester hours of academic credit), Infant/Toddler Care Certificate (16 semester hours of academic credit), and Early Childhood Administration Certificate (16 semester hours of academic credit).

The Early Childhood Education diploma may be obtained by taking 13 courses, earning a total of 38 semester hours of academic credit.

The Early Childhood Education degree may be earned in two years as a full-time day student or in three years as a part-time evening student. Degree students earn 69 or 70 hours of academic credit.

The Early Childhood Education Transfer with Licensure and Transfer with No Licensure degree tracks may be earned in two years as a full-time day student or in three years as a part-time evening student. Students earn 71 hours of academic credit.


COMPETENCIES

Upon successful completion of the Early Childhood Education program, the graduate should be able to:

  • Plan developmentally appropriate activities for children 0-8.
  • Demonstrate appropriate guidance techniques for children.
  • Demonstrate leadership skills in teaching.

 

TECHNICAL STANDARDS

The Early Childhood Education program requires the performance of essential functions in order to provide safe and effective instruction to young children. To effectively educate students to work in the profession, the performance of these functions is incorporated throughout the program within lab and live settings. Students are required to demonstrate proficiency of these functions to progress through the program. The essential functions include:

  1. Critical Thinking – critical thinking skills sufficient to identify complex problems; review related information; and to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions. For example, students should be able to develop classroom curriculum activities that address multiple factors in a developmentally appropriate manner.
  2. Interpersonal Skills - interpersonal abilities sufficient to interact with faculty, other teachers, directors, children, and children’s families under physically and mentally demanding environmental conditions. For example, students should be able to communicate information about children’s progress to the appropriate parties.
  3. Communication Skills – communication skills sufficient to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand. For example, students should be able to provide verbal instruction to children in a developmentally appropriate manner.
  4. Mobility – mobility sufficient to perform physical activities that require considerable use of arms and legs and moving the whole body, such as lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of equipment. For example, students should be able to ensure the safety of children in both indoor and outdoor settings.
  5. Motor Skills – motor skills sufficient to quickly move the hands; hand together with the arm; and two hands to grasp, manipulate, and perform procedures in a specific manner. For example, students should be able to demonstrate and assist children with art projects.
  6. Hearing: ability to hear sounds at a close range (within a few feet of the observer). For example, students should be able to hear and respond to an instructor or other students in a classroom.
  7. Tactile: tactile ability to perform physical activities that require use of hands and arms. For example, students should possess the ability to write reports and perform group projects..
  8. Cognitive: cognitive ability to use logic and reason, attention to detail, and short-term and long-term memory skills. For example, students should possess the ability to remember a concept covered in a class in a previous week of a semester and effectively apply the learned information.
  9. Visual – visual skills sufficient to ensure the safety of the children. For example, students should be able to determine inappropriate behavior across the classroom and intervene as needed.
  10. Weight-Bearing – weight-bearing skills sufficient to lift or carry 20-50 pounds. For example, students should be able to lift children onto a diaper changing table or into a stroller.
  11. 11. Listening – listening skills sufficient to give full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. For example, students should be able to interact with children and family on a frequent basis; listening skills must be mastered.

EXAMPLES ARE NOT ALL INCLUSIVE.
Randolph Community College is an ADA compliant institution. The College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admissions process or in access to its programs, services and/or activities for qualified individuals who meet essential eligibility requirements. The College will provide reasonable accommodations for documented disabilities of individuals who are eligible to receive or participate in college programs, services and/or activities. Student Services provides a disability counselor to assist students in requesting disability related accommodations. If a student believes that he/she cannot meet one or more of the essential functions without accommodations, the student is encouraged to disclose the disability to the disability counselor as soon as possible. Students must certify the ability to meet essential functions of the curriculum by a signed statement when they begin the program.

Gainful Employment Information

Diploma
Certificate
Infant/Toddler Care Certificate
Early Childhood Administration Certificate