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Information Technology

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Are you interested in technology and building a rewarding career in programming, repairing, and working with computers? The Information Technology (IT) curriculum prepares you for employment in the technology sector as a designer, tester, support technician, system administrator, developer or programmer. Depending on the technical path selected within this curriculum, you will learn to use computer software and/or hardware to design, process, implement, and manage information systems in specialties such as database services, security, business intelligence, healthcare informatics, and others.

You will qualify for employment in positions with businesses, educational systems and governmental agencies which rely on computer systems to design and manage information. You will also learn to fulfill the competencies of industry-recognized certification exams.

[A25590S]

Courses for this A.A.S. degree program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (16 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ACA 111 - College Student Success
  • CIS 110 - Introduction to Computers
  • CTI 110 - Web, Pgm., & DB Foundation
  • CTI 120 - Network and Sec Foundation
  • ENG 111 - Writing and Inquiry U
  • NOS 110 - Operating Systems Concepts

First Year: Spring Semester (15 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Session (9 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CIS 115 - Introduction to Programming & Logic
  • NOS 130 - Windows Single User
  • SEC 110 - Security Concepts

Second Year: Fall Semester (12 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Spring Semester (13 or 15 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTI 289 - CTI Capstone Project OR WBL 111S - Work-Based learning I - ITSS
  • CTI 140 - Virtualization Concepts
  • WEB 110 - Internet/Web Fundamentals
  • --- Humanities/Fine Arts Course
  • --- Social/Behavioral Science

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS CREDIT: 65-67

Humanities/Fine Arts Electives (choose one)

Social/Behavioral Science Electives (choose one)

  • ECO 251 - Prin of Microeconomics U
  • ECO 252 - Prin of Macroeconomics U
  • POL 120 - American Government U
  • PSY 150 - General Psychology U
  • SOC 210 - Introduction to Sociology U

U indicates a University General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course included in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. UGETC courses are guaranteed to transfer to any of the sixteen University of North Carolina senior institutions as equivalent credit within defined distribution limits.

[A25590N]

Courses for this A.A.S. degree program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (16 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ACA 111 - College Student Success
  • CIS 110 - Introduction to Computers
  • CTI 110 - Web, Pgm., & DB Foundation
  • CTI 120 - Network and Sec Foundation
  • NET 125 - Introduction to Networks
  • NOS 110 - Operating Systems Concepts

First Year: Spring Semester (12 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Session (9 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CIS 115 - Introduction to Programming & Logic
  • NOS 130 - Windows Single User
  • SEC 110 - Security Concepts

Second Year: Fall Semester (15 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ENG 112 - Writing/Research in the Disc U
  • MAT 110 - Math Measurement & Literacy
  • NET 225 - Routing & Switching I
  • NOS 120 - Linux/UNIX Single User
  • SEC 160 - Security Administration I

Second Year: Spring Semester (15 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CCT 250 - Network Vulnerabilities I
  • CTI 289 - CTI Capstone Project
  • SEC 260 - Security Admin II
  • --- Humanities/Fine Arts Course
  • --- Social/Behavioral Science

Total Semester Hours Credit: 67

Humanities/Fine Arts Electives (choose one)

Social/Behavioral Science Electives (choose one)

  • ECO 251 - Prin of Microeconomics U
  • ECO 252 - Prin of Macroeconomics U
  • POL 120 - American Government U
  • PSY 150 - General Psychology U
  • SOC 210 - Introduction to Sociology U

U indicates a University General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course included in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. UGETC courses are guaranteed to transfer to any of the sixteen University of North Carolina senior institutions as equivalent credit within defined distribution limits.

[A25590AP]

Courses for this A.A.S. degree program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

Pre-Apprenticeship: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CIS 115 - Intro to Programming & Logic

First Year: Fall Semester (7 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ACA 111 - College Student Success
  • CTI 120 - Network and Sec Foundation
  • NOS 110 - Operating Systems Concepts

First Year: Spring Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Summer Session (3 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Fall Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTI 110 - Web, Pgm & DB Foundations
  • NET 125 - Introduction to Networks

Second Year: Spring Semester (9 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTS 115 - Info System Business Concepts
  • ENG 111 - Writing and Inquiry
  • MAT 110 - Math Measurement & Literacy

Third Year: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ENG 112 - Writing/Research in the Disc

Third Year: Fall Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

  • --- Humanities/Fine Art
  • NOS 120 - Linux/UNIX Single User

Third Year: Spring Semester (8 Semester Hours Credit)

  • DBA 110 - Database Concepts
  • WBL 112T - Work-Based Learning I-ITSS
  • --- Social/Behavior Science

Fourth Year: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

Fourth Year: Fall Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

Fourth Year: Spring Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTI 140 - Virtualization Concepts
  • WEB 110 - Internet/Web Fundamentals

Total Semester Hours Credit: 65

Humanities/Fine Arts Electives (choose one)

Social/Behavioral Science Electives (choose one)

  • ECO 251 - Prin of Microeconomics U
  • ECO 252 - Prin of Macroeconomics U
  • POL 120 - American Government U
  • PSY 150 - General Psychology U
  • SOC 210 - Introduction to Sociology U

U indicates a University General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course included in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. UGETC courses are guaranteed to transfer to any of the sixteen University of North Carolina senior institutions as equivalent credit within defined distribution limits.

[C25590S]

Courses for this certificate program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (12 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CIS 110 - Introduction to Computers
  • CTI 110 - Web, Pgm., & DB Foundation
  • CTI 120 - Network and Sec Foundation
  • NOS 110 - Operating Systems Concepts

First Year: Spring Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTS 115 - Info System Business Concepts
  • CTS 120 - Hardware/Software Support 

Total Semester Hours Credit: 18

[C25590N]

Courses for this certificate program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (9 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTI 120 - Network and Sec Foundation
  • NOS 110 - Operating Systems Concepts
  • NET 125 - Introduction to Networks

First Year: Spring Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

Total Semester Hours Credit: 18

[C25590V]

Courses for this certificate program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Fall Semester (9 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Spring Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTI 140 - Virtualization Concepts

Total Semester Hours Credit: 15

[C25590AP]

Courses for this certificate program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

Pre-Apprenticeship: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CIS 115 - Intro to Programming & Logic

First Year: Fall Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

  • CTI 120 - Network and Sec Foundation
  • NOS 110 - Operating Systems Concepts

First Year: Spring Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

Total Semester Hours Credit: 15

Upon successful completion of the Information Technology program, the student should be able to:

  • Explain terminology and concepts used by computer technicians.
  • Use interpersonal skills to interact with business users on computer issues.
  • Effectively communicate and exchange ideas and information with others through oral, written, or visual means.

The Information Technology (IT) curriculum prepares graduates for employment in the technology sector as designers, testers, support technicians, system administrators, developers, or programmers who use computer software and/or hardware to design, process, implement and manage information systems in specialties such as database services, security, business intelligence, healthcare informatics and others depending on the technical path selected within this curriculum. To effectively train Information Technology professionals, the performance of certain functions is incorporated throughout the program. Faculty and students are required to demonstrate proficiency of these functions in the Information Technology program. The essential functions include:

  1. Critical Thinking: critical thinking ability sufficient to gather relevant information, interpret data recognize problems, and use a process to make informed, independent decisions that show good judgment. For example, making a good decision about the best computer to purchase based on user needs, how to resolve a network/security issue, debug a website or simulation program.
  2. Interpersonal Skills: interpersonal abilities sufficient to interact with other students, function and contribute as part of a team, be accountable for self and others, and maintain appropriate hygiene for an office environment. For example, the ability to communicate properly with other students on a team project.
  3. Communication Skills: communication skills sufficient to speak English, write English, listen and comprehend written and spoken words, and communicate information and ideas so others will understand. For example, the ability to communicate problems in completing a project with an instructor.
  4. Mobility: possess sufficient mobility to be able to complete computer and network installation and repairs related to computer hardware, software, and peripheral equipment.
  5. Motor Skills: motor skills sufficient to sit for extended periods of time and manual dexterity for computer work/keyboarding, ability to work with small objects and small hand tools. For example, the ability to install more memory inside a personal computer.
  6. Hearing: hearing ability to hear sounds at a close range (within a few feet of the observer). For example, being able to hear and respond to an instructor or other students in a classroom.
  7. Visual: visual ability to see with normal or corrected vision, tolerate working indoors in artificial light and the glare of computer screens. For example, the ability to look at a computer screen for long periods of time.
  8. Tactile: tactile ability to perform physical activities that require use of hands and arms. For example, the ability to install computer software on a computer, install cables for network systems, etc....
  9. Weight-Bearing: weight-bearing ability to lift and move 30 pounds. For example, the ability to lift a personal computer before repairing it.
  10. Cognitive: cognitive ability to use logic and reason, attention to detail, and short-term and long-term memory skills. For example, the ability to remember a concept covered in a class in a previous week of a semester.

EXAMPLES ARE NOT ALL INCLUSIVE.
Randolph Community College is an ADA compliant institution. The College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admissions process or in access to its programs, services and/or activities for qualified individuals who meet essential eligibility requirements. The College will provide reasonable accommodations for documented disabilities of individuals who are eligible to receive or participate in college programs, services and/or activities. Student Services provides a disability counselor to assist students in requesting disability related accommodations. If a student believes that he/she cannot meet one or more of the essential functions without accommodations, the student is encouraged to disclose the disability to the disability counselor as soon as possible. Students must certify the ability to meet essential functions of the curriculum by a signed statement when they begin the program.

Contact Us!

Have more questions about the Information Technology Program? We're here to help.

Stephen Baltes
Instructor, Information Technology
sjbaltes@randolph.edu
3
36-633-0326

Curby Simerson
Department Head, Information Technology
clsimerson@randolph.edu
336-633-0326