car prepped for paint

Collision Repair & Refinishing Technology

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Do you enjoy repairing automobiles? If so, our Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology program is the program for you. Discover and develop the skills needed to build a career in the transportation industry and learn about the diverse technologies associated with this dynamic and challenging field. You'll get detailed instruction in structure analysis, damage repair, non-structural analysis, mechanical and electrical components, plastics and adhesives, painting and refinishing techniques, and damage analysis and estimating.

When you complete the program, you'll be prepared for a position in the transportation industry and ready to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, reconstruct and finish automobile bodies, fenders and external features.

[A60130] 

Courses for this A.A.S. degree program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (19 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Spring Semester (17 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Session (6 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Fall Semester (13 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Spring Semester (11 or 14 Semester Hours Credit)

  • AUC 112 - Auto Custom Fabrication
  • AUB 144 - Mech & Elect Specialties
  • ARS 111 - Managing Automobile Org OR WBL 121R - Work-Based Learning II - CRR
  • --- Humanities/Fine Arts
  • --- Social/Behavioral Science

Total Semester Hours Credit: 67 or 72

Humanities/Fine Arts Electives (choose one)

Social/Behavioral Science Electives (choose one)

[D60130]

Courses for this diploma program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (19 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Spring Semester (17 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Session (6 Semester Hours Credit)

Total Semester Hours Credit: 42

[C60130]

Courses for this certificate program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (10 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Spring Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

 Total Semester Hours Credit: 16

Upon successful completion of the Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology program, the student should be able to:

  • Construct welds according to industry standards.
  • Analyze damage, plan and conduct repairs.
  • Explain and perform refinishing procedures.
  • Prepare written estimates on damaged vehicles.

Curriculums in the Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology pathway prepare individuals for employment as entry-level transportation service technicians.  The program provides an introduction to transportation industry careers and increases student awareness of the diverse technologies associated with this dynamic and challenging field. To effectively train Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology professionals, the performance of certain functions is incorporated throughout the program. Faculty and students are required to demonstrate proficiency of these functions in the Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology program. The essential functions include:

  1. Critical Thinking: critical thinking ability sufficient to gather relevant information, interpret data, recognize problems, and use a process to make informed, independent decisions that show good judgment. For example, making a good decision about the best financial report to produce based on user needs.
  2. Interpersonal Skills: interpersonal abilities sufficient to interact with co-workers and clients, function and contribute as part of a team, be accountable for self and others, and maintain appropriate hygiene for an office environment. For example, the ability to interact effectively with other members on a team project.
  3. Communication Skills: speak English, write English, listen and comprehend written and spoken words, and communicate information and ideas so others will understand
  4. Mobility: mobility that is appropriate for an office or classroom setting is needed. For example, mobile enough to sit and stand repeatedly in an office setting.
  5. Motor Skills: be able to sit for extended periods of time and manual dexterity. For
  6. example, as needed for computer work/keyboarding.
  7. Hearing: hearing ability to hear sounds at a close range (within a few feet of the observer). For example, being able to hear and respond to an instructor or other students in a classroom.
  8. Visual: visual ability to see with normal or corrected vision, tolerate working indoors in artificial light and the glare of computer screens. For example, the ability to look at a computer screen for long periods of time.
  9. Tactile: ability to perform physical activities that require use of hands and arms. For example, possessing finger and manual dexterity necessary to manipulate computer and other office equipment.
  10. Weight-Bearing: none.
  11. Cognitive: cognitive ability to use logic and reason, attention to detail, and short-term and long­ term memory skills. For example, the ability to remember a concept covered in a class in a previous week of a semester.
  12. Visual Color Discrimination: visual color discrimination ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness. For example, being able to wire three­ way and four-way switches.
  13. Information Ordering: information ordering ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations). For example, designing the electrical system of a building.
  14. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge: keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  15. Repairing: repairing machines or systems using the needed tools. Example is using a wrench.
  16. Equipment Maintenance: performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed. Example is scheduled preventive maintenance.
  17. Troubleshooting: determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it. Example is examining and finding the cause of the problem.
  18. Critical Thinking: using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Example is to determine the necessary steps to solve the problem.
  19. Equipment Selection: determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job. Example is when do you use a screw driver and when do you use a hammer.
  20. Operation Monitoring: watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly. Example is observing the operation of a machine during a normal operation.
  21. Reading Comprehension: understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Example is reading a technical manual.
  22. Reaction Time: the ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears. Example is to be able to watch and monitor the working of a proximity switch in a PLC.
  23. Control Precision: the ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions. Example is being able to align a shift to where it needs to be at the start of an operation.
  24. Manual Dexterity: the ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects. Example is to be able to rebuild a solenoid valve.
  25. Arm-Hand Steadiness: the ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position. Example is the ability to change bearings in a piece equipment.
  26. Finger Dexterity: the ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects. Example is to be able to start a nut on a screw.
  27. Near Vision: the ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer). Example is watching the Input/Output numbers on a PLC.
  28. Hearing Sensitivity: the ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness. Example is to be able to listen to a motor and determine if it is running properly.
  29. Multi-Limb Coordination: the ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion. Example is the ability to change out a motor that has been determined to be bad.
  30. Problem Sensitivity: the ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem. Example is to be able to determine is a problem is present in an operation of a machine.
  31. Physical skills: physical abilities sufficient to perform welding skills in a hot (90+degree) and cold environment, dexterity to perform welds in all positions (flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead) at floor level and heights over six feet, ability to use hand tools such as grinders, oxy-act torch and hammer.
  32. Listening: listening skills sufficient to give full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate and not interrupting at inappropriate times. For example, listening to faculty and customers' assessment of problem.
  33. Monitoring: monitoring ability sufficient to monitor/assess performance of yourself, others, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. For example, being able to recognize defects and being able to repair it.
  34. Visual Color Discrimination: visual color discrimination ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness. For example, being identify and match paint color.

EXAMPLES ARE NOT ALL INCLUSIVE.
Randolph Community College is an ADA compliant institution. The College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admissions process or in access to its programs, services and/or activities for qualified individuals who meet essential eligibility requirements. The College will provide reasonable accommodations for documented disabilities of individuals who are eligible to receive or participate in college programs, services and/or activities. Student Services provides a disability counselor to assist students in requesting disability related accommodations. If a student believes that he/she cannot meet one or more of the essential functions without accommodations, the student is encouraged to disclose the disability to the disability counselor as soon as possible. Students must certify the ability to meet essential functions of the curriculum by a signed statement when they begin the program.

Contact Us!

Have more questions about the Collision Repair and Refinishing Technology Program? We're here to help.

W.T. Brewer
Department Head, Collision Repair & Refinishing Technology
wtbrewer@randolph.edu
336-633-0377