Advanced Manufacturing Lab

Automation Engineering Technology

Automation Engineering Technology LogoIf you like problem solving and learning how things work, our Automation Engineering Technology program may be the perfect fit for you. Through coursework in computer systems, electronics and instrumentation, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), various control systems, actuator and sensor systems, process control, and robotics, you will learn how to use basic engineering principles and technical skills to develop, install, calibrate, modify and maintain automated systems.

When you’re finished, you will be prepared to find employment in many industries ranging from automotive manufacturing to food processing. Job opportunities include Maintenance Technician, Automation Technician, Automation Engineer, Engineering Specialist, Engineering Technician, and Reliability Technician. The opportunities are endless!

[A40120]

Courses for this A.A.S. degree program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (15 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ACA 111 - College Student Success
  • ELC 125 - Diagrams & Schematics 
  • ELN 133 - Digital Electronics
  • H/FA -  Humanities/Fine Arts
  • HYD 110 - Hydraulics/Pneumatics I
  • ISC 112 - Industrial Safety

First Year: Spring Semester (16 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Semester (9 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Fall Semester (16 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Spring Semester (16 Semester Hours Credit)

Total Semester Hours Credit: 72

[D40120]

Courses for this diploma program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (15 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ACA 111 - College Student Success
  • ELC 125 - Diagrams & Schematics 
  • ELN 133 - Digital Electronics
  • H/FA -  Humanities/Fine Arts
  • HYD 110 - Hydraulics/Pneumatics I
  • ISC 112 - Industrial Safety

First Year: Spring Semester (16 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Semester (9 Semester Hours Credit)

Total Semester Hours Credit: 40

[C40120A] & [C40120HA]

Courses for this certificate program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (2 Semester Hours Credit)

  • ELC 125 - Diagrams & Schematics 

First Year: Spring Semester (4 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Fall Semester (4 Semester Hours Credit)

Total Semester Hours Credit: 13

[C40120H] & [C40120HB]

Courses for this certificate program are offered day, evening, online and/or hybrid.

First Year: Fall Semester (6 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Spring Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

First Year: Summer Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

Second Year: Fall Semester (3 Semester Hours Credit)

Total Semester Hours Credit: 15

Upon successful completion of the Automation Engineering Technology program, the student should be able to:

  1. Plan and construct commercial and industrial motor control circuits. 
  2. Identify, explain, and troubleshoot hydraulic/pneumatic circuits. 
  3. Create various simple PLC programs using the appropriate instruction set and apply appropriate troubleshooting methods to PLC. 
  4. Understand the basic concepts and demonstrate knowledge of automation, robotic and data communication systems. 
  5. Demonstrate proper use of general mechanical maintenance knowledge.  

The Automation Engineering Technology course of study prepares students to use basic engineering principles and technical skills to develop, install, calibrate, modify and maintain automated systems. Includes instruction in computer systems; electronics and instrumentation; programmable logic controllers (PLCs); electric, hydraulic and pneumatic control systems; actuator and sensor systems; process control; robotics; applications to specific industrial tasks. The graduates of this curriculum will be prepared for employment in industries that utilize control systems, computer hardware and software, electrical, mechanical and electromechanical devices in their automation systems. The essential functions include:

  1. Reaction Time: The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears. Ability to safely operate in and around electricity. Example is to be able to watch and monitor the working of a proximity switch in a PLC.
  2. Near Vision: The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer). Visual skills sufficient to see details at close range, ability to distinguish colors, shades, and textures, visual skills to inspect or assess for safety.
  3. Multi-Limb Coordination: The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion. Example is the ability to change out a motor that has been determined to be bad.
  4. Manual Dexterity: The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects. Example is to be able to rebuild a solenoid valve.
  5. Arm-Hand Steadiness: The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position. Example is the ability to change bearings in a piece equipment.
  6. Finger Dexterity: The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects. Example is to be able to start a nut on a bolt.
  7. Hearing Sensitivity: The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness. Example is to be able to listen to a motor and determine if it is running properly.
  8. Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Ability to perform basic computer functions. Example is to determine the necessary steps to solving the problem.
  9. Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Example is reading a technical manual.
  10. Operation Monitoring: Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly. Example is observing the operation of a machine during a normal operation.
  11. Problem Sensitivity: The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem. Example is to be able to determine if a problem is present in an operation of a machine.
  12. Control Precision: The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions. Example is being able to align a shift to where it needs to be at the start of an operation.
  13. Troubleshooting: Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it. Example is examining and finding the cause of the problem.
  14. Information Ordering: The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations). Example is reading a set of blueprints.
  15. Equipment Selection: Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job. Example is when do you use a screw driver and when do you use a hammer.
  16. Equipment Maintenance: Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed. Example is scheduled preventive maintenance.
  17. Repairing: Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools. Example is using a wrench.

EXAMPLES ARE NOT ALL INCLUSIVE.

Randolph Community College is an ADA compliant institution. The College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admissions process or in access to its programs, services and/or activities for qualified individuals who meet essential eligibility requirements. The College will provide reasonable accommodations for documented disabilities of individuals who are eligible to receive or participate in college programs, services and/or activities. Student Services provides a disability counselor to assist students in requesting disability related accommodations. If a student believes that he/she cannot meet one or more of the essential functions without accommodations, the student is encouraged to disclose the disability to the disability counselor as soon as possible. Students must certify the ability to meet essential functions of the profession by a signed statement in the beginning of the program.

Contact Us!

Have more questions about the Automation Engineering Technology Program? We're here to help.

Wesley Moore
Department Head, Industrial Programs
whmoore@randolph.edu
336-318-0496